This tree is native to the Midwest and Eastern United States and is hardy in zones 4 to 9.(State tree of Oklahoma) A rather rapidly growing but small tree, reaching heights of 25-35 feet tall, however in most urban situations it is more likely to reach 15’×15’. The tiered and slightly irregular branching form an overall rounded habit. Due to its rather quick growth rate and susceptibility to disease and pest it is a short lived tree in urban situation. Expect 15-20 years if cared for properly.

Small rose-pink flowers emerge usually second year wood in the spring before the deep green 3-6 inch long heart shapes leaves emerge.

Often grown as a single trunked tree generally low branched, it is also grown as a multi-stemmed tree. The bark is brownish grey that exfoliated in small strips, and as it ages the bark becomes more furrowed.

Often grown as a single trunked tree generally low branched, it is also grown as a multi-stemmed tree. The bark is brownish grey that exfoliated in small strips, and as it ages the bark becomes more furrowed.

Cercis canadensis is prone to several diseases and pests such as: Verticillium wilt, scale, heartwood rot and trunk cankers. As the tree ages in many cases it will develop a noticeable lean and is susceptible to storm damage due to the leaning and heartwood rot.

Putting the weaknesses aside the bright floral display and compact habit makes this a tree well suited for small urban situations. Often used as a focal point in the landscape, the dense habit and medium texture of the Eastern Redbud also does well in groupings and naturalized areas of the landscape.

A couple of selected varieties:

Cercis canadensis alba – White flowers, would contrast well when planted with the species.

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ – Reddish purple new foliage emerges and then fades to bronze to dark green as the season progresses. Darker lavender flowers than the species and not quite as hardy (zones 6-9)